Sketchcrawl at the UCD Arboretum

We met at the steps of the Mrak Building on the UCD campus right along the arboretum. The regulars met as well as out-of-towners from the Sacramento area – Carmichael.

Two young girls with their mother join us. After an attempt to sketch the Taiko drummers who regularly practiced on Saturdays mornings at the top for the garage parking building, the nippy wind forced us inside the Manetti Shrem museum. Here I was able to captured the two girls.

I used Noodlers Kiowa Pecan ink filled in a TWSBI fountain pen. I love my TWSBI and the color of the ink but the ink was something to get used to. I discovered with the palm tree drawing that the ink is water soluble. I had to be very careful on the amount of water to apply without destroying the lines. Other that it produces a very interesting effect…

042818_Amy
Amy, 8 x 5 inches in Moleskine watercolor sketchbook, watercolor and ink by Marlene Lee
042818_Sophia
Sophia, 8 x 5 inches in Moleskine watercolor sketchbook, watercolor and ink by Marlene Lee
042818_Palm Tree
The Palm Tree, 8 x 5 inches in Moleskine watercolor sketchbook, watercolor and ink by Marlene Lee

Encaustic Portrait Painting Workshop

I took this workshop back in February. Taught by Francisco Benitez, he introduced us to the history of encaustics painting. Encaustic painting were first discovered among the Egyptians and Greeks artists. Egyptians used encaustics for their Fayum portrait paintings for tombs and Greeks for their paintings on ships.

In this workshop, Benitz introduced encaustic portrait painting. We worked from a live model. First did a quick sketch to determine composition, and shadows/light patterns then we laid in a pencil outline of the model on a canvas panel.

The colors are heated; we used the 4 colors that the ancient Greeks and Egyptians used – white, black, red and yellow ochre. Sound familiar? Zorn! Two piles are created – reddish tone for shadows and the yellowish tone for lights.

The wax color is either painted on with the heated blow gun keeping it melted enough to spread. Or the color is brushed on and then heated with the blow gun to fused the wax color to the bottom layer. A heated tool is provided for detail. Bristle brushes are used instead of synthetic so they do not melt.

Photo references in my FB fanpage shows how Benitz worked when painting his portraits.

Encaustic Portrait Painting Workshop